100 Black Men of Maryland | History
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History

 

100 HISTORY

The overall concept of the 100 began in New York in 1963 when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. The group eventually adopted the name, “100 Black Men, Inc.” as a sign of solidarity. These men envisioned an organization that would implement programs designed to improve the quality of life for African Americans and other minorities. They also wished to ensure the future of their communities by aiming an intense number of resources toward youth development. These members were successful black men from various walks of life. These visionaries were business and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate, Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson.

Dr. William Hayling, a member of the NY organization, had relocated to Newark, NJ and sought to replicate the 100’s impact in that area. In 1976 Dr. Hayling formed the 100 Black Men of New Jersey. A movement had been born. Men across the country began to form 100 Black Men organizations to leverage their collective talents and resources. Chapters were formed in Los Angeles, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, San Francisco/Oakland Bay Area, Nassau/Suffolk, Alton, and Sacramento.

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100 BLACK MEN OF MARYLAND HISTORY

On a Saturday morning in March 1991, a group of Black men held a meeting in Baltimore City’s Friendship Baptist Church. The purpose of the meeting was to form an organization designed to halt destructive directions being taken by many of our black youth. Following that meeting, the 100 Black Men of America, Inc. whose mission is specifically directed towards improving the conditions of African American youth, was contacted for information about starting a chapter in Maryland.

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